Meet The New Boss, Same As The Old Boss

Nothing to see here, move along.

Critics Decry Looser Rules For Inauguration Fundraising : It’s All Politics : NPR: A week from Monday, President Obama is to take his public oath of office for a second term.

The inauguration will be marked by celebratory balls and other festivities, sponsored by the privately financed Presidential Inaugural Committee. The first Obama inauguration had strict fundraising rules. But this year, the rules have been loosened, and critics wonder what happened to the president’s old pledge to change the way Washington works.

Here’s how candidate Barack Obama put it during a 2008 debate: “We’re going to have to change the culture in Washington so that lobbyists and special interests aren’t driving the process and your voices aren’t being drowned out.”

For the inaugural committee in 2009, the fundraising limit was $50,000 per individual; no corporate money was allowed. Four years later, the maximum contribution is $1 million, and corporations are being solicited.

And on the debt ceiling in 2006 vs 2013?

“The fact that we are here today to debate raising America’s debt limit is a sign of leadership failure. It is a sign that the U.S. government can’t pay its own bills. … I therefore intend to oppose the effort to increase America’s debt limit.”
— Then-Sen. Barack Obama, floor speech in the Senate, March 16, 2006

He wasn’t alone in 2006.

Top Dems urging Obama to raise debt ceiling all voted against increase in ’06 – WashingtonExaminer.com: On March 16, 2006, the Senate held a vote on a measure to raise the debt ceiling by $781 billion — the fourth such vote of George W. Bush’s presidency. Republicans controlled the Senate, and Democrats spent much of the debate railing against Bush’s spending. “When it comes to deficits, this president owns all the records,” said Reid. “The three largest deficits in our nation’s history have all occurred under this administration’s watch.”

Declaring themselves outraged by such spending, Reid, Durbin, Schumer, and Murray all voted against raising the debt limit. So did every other Democrat — including Sen. Barack Obama. But on Friday, the four lawmakers urged now-President Obama not only to raise the ceiling but to do it in a constitutionally risky fashion by going over the head of Congress.